Opinion

Was Vashon man’s $1,000 drinking fine warranted? | In Our Opinion

When The Beachcomber heard Monday that a patron had been fined more than $1,000 for allegedly drinking too much at the Strawberry Festival’s beer garden, we thought it was likely the stuff of rumor — an urban legend, Vashon-style. It turns out it’s true.

  • Jul 16, 2008

Was Vashon man’s $1,000 drinking fine warranted? | Editorial

When The Beachcomber heard Monday that a patron had been fined more than $1,000 for allegedly drinking too much at the Strawberry Festival’s beer garden, we thought it was likely the stuff of rumor — an urban legend, Vashon-style. It turns out it’s true.

  • Jul 16, 2008

WSF reservation system on Vashon may work

Would a ferry reservation system work for Vashon? The Transportation Commission, appointed by the governor, has been pushing this approach to find ways to fund the ferry system. Washington State Ferries (WSF) was mandated to ask the question, given the traffic congestion at a number of ferry docks and the challenge of filling every boat to capacity. And how can they do this andkeep ferry tolls reasonable (which they aren’t now)?

  • Jul 15, 2008

Rep. Nelson: Army Corps’ decision on Vashon dock was a failure of political will

This past week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers determined it would permit Glacier’s proposed barge-loading facility within Maury’s sensitive shoreline. The agency refused to require a federal environmental impact statement. With the federal government having listed the chinook as a threatened species and our beloved orcas as endangered, this decision casts a major shadow over efforts to recover these species and Puget Sound.

  • Jul 9, 2008

In our opinion Glacier’s green light, Vashon’s dark day

Last week, this paper reported some of the first good news in a few years about the long, hard, Quixote-like struggle to keep Glacier Northwest at bay. Preserve Our Islands, the grassroots group opposing Glacier, had successfully convinced state regulators to hold the sand and gravel company to the highest standard possible under the state’s voter-approved toxic cleanup law.

  • Jul 9, 2008

Independence Day celebrations should be kind to creation as well

Traditions are important. The things we do as each year follows another can be the ties that bind families, organizations, cultures and nations, to name a few possibilities. In a world that more and more crosses national boundaries, where people live in places they were not born, traditions can be strengths that hold one’s roots. They can be shared experiences that cross all national, racial and cultural boundaries and bring people together in celebrations of human ethos.

  • Jul 8, 2008

Collective farming enriches the lives of all the farmers involved

Shoulder-To-Shoulder Farm, one of Vashon’s hidden treasures, spreads out behind Vashon Cohousing on land leased from the Roseballen Community Land Trust.

  • Jul 8, 2008

State needs to address tax issues to fix King County budget

How would cutting 100 sheriff’s deputies affect police response times? How would a reduction of 30 deputy prosecutors impact our ability to put criminal suspects on trial? These are examples of the grim decisions facing King County citizens and lawmakers as we confront a $68 million budget deficit for 2009 and a possible $80 million shortfall in 2010.

  • Jul 2, 2008

Stretch your shrinking dollar by enjoying a ‘staycation’ at home

I predict the next edition of Webster’s Dictionary will contain a word born from this economic period: ‘staycation.’ You’ve likely heard this new word beat to death by the media as the answer to the cost-prohibitive summer vacation of 2008. Instead of paying skyrocketing fuel costs to jet or drive off to get away from it all, many of us are planning to hunker down in our own domains for a long staycation.

  • Jul 2, 2008

Workers are Vashon’s backbone

t And what if they all went on strike?

  • Jul 2, 2008

The hottest months of the year can be busy and stressful

“You can always tell the English. You can always tell the Dutch. You can always tell Lubahn’s class, but you can’t tell much. Thank goodness it’s Friday!”

  • Jul 1, 2008

Often shunned, horsetail actually has an abundance of medicinal benefits

Many plants that are maligned as weeds are actually highly beneficial, with a long history of use by humans. After hearing about a friend’s determination and challenges in eradicating horsetail from his yard and listening to his children mimic his “I hate horsetail” mantra, I felt compelled to point out the practical and important uses of this botanical oddity.

  • Jul 1, 2008

Fighting Glacier

To some of us, it may seem like tilting at windmills to take on Glacier Northwest. The company is huge, rich and relentless. It also, obviously, has a keen financial interest in the tons of sand and gravel that lie beneath its arsenic-laced soil — a commodity that has proven to be quite valuable in booming Pugetopolis, where new development means new roads and new roads mean a hunger for gravel.

  • Jul 1, 2008

Vashon mother considers miracle of new baby

On March 28, with six weeks to go until my due date, my midwife worried that the baby’s growth had slowed. She ordered an ultrasound. The technician started out chatty as she squirted goo on my tummy and flashed grey blobs on the screen. Then she fell silent. The doctor, too, looked gravely at the screen and didn’t say anything. They sent me straight to the hospital, sheet of indecipherable medical jargon in hand.

  • Jun 26, 2008

Summer can be mischevious, dangerous time for Vashon kids

Kids are rejoicing. Parents who work outside of the home are scrambling to piece it all together. And a new energy has already, it seems, come to the Island.

  • Jun 26, 2008

Abundant Vashon deer could be profitable if domesticated

The pea sprouts are about 10 inches high now. Noticing this, I decided I’d better patrol the perimeter of the deer fence that was erected after one summer when we got home to find the deer had eaten every single pea plant down to the nub.

  • Jun 26, 2008

Eric Horsting stepping down after run as arts editor, sports editor, reporter…

Last August, after a brief vacation, I returned to The Beachcomber with a gift for Eric Horsting, who had steered the ship in my absence. It was a smooth, pale-gray rock with a poem on it, and it seemed the perfect token for this man who loves poetry and is rock solid and dependable.

Eric Horsting gave it his all — and covered it all — week after week Eric Horsting gave it his all — and covered it all — week after week

Last August, after a brief vacation, I returned to The Beachcomber with a gift for Eric Horsting, who had steered the ship in my absence. It was a smooth, pale-gray rock with a poem on it, and it seemed the perfect token for this man who loves poetry and is rock solid and dependable.

Fern Cove’s cobbles make for hard walking, but it’s well worth it

Mud then cobbles and more cobbles, the hike from Fern Cove south to Cove on Colvos Passage tours Vashon’s best beach forms. The first wonder is Fern Cove’s delta, then Peter Point’s salt marsh and finally the big rock before Cove.

  • Jun 25, 2008

Making jam in June: It is a metaphor for living life

June, with graduations and weddings and the garden’s demand for attention, is the calendar’s metaphor for a homemade jar of jam. You take the barely ripe fruits of your labors, give them a grand push of formality, endure the heat of an impossible schedule and an expensive, dizzying list of to-do’s and cross your fingers the finished product achieves a “successful set.”

  • Jun 20, 2008